All posts tagged: Malorie Blackman

Malorie Blackman calls for more diversity in publishing

I was startled to read a tweet today saying Malorie Blackman had closed her Twitter account after a deluge of racist messages. Here’s what happened. The Edinburgh International Books Festival was held last weekend and in her capacity as children’s laureate Malorie Blackman did the media rounds talking up UK books, but also highlighting the lack of ethnic diversity in children’s publishing. She told Sky News that a lack of diversity in books can discourage children of colour from reading and make them feel excluded: “I think there is a very significant message that goes out when you cannot see yourself at all in the books you are reading. “I think it is saying ‘well, you may be here, but do you really belong?” A sub editor at Sky decided to title the story with the provocative and inaccurate headline: Children’s Books ‘Have Too Many White Faces’ says Malorie Blackman, which was all the invitation the internet trolls needed. Malorie received an avalanche of racist criticism on her Twitter feed. And responses to the story …

Malorie Blackman laughs at the camera

10 things you never knew about rock star author Malorie Blackman

Malorie Blackman has written over  60 books, was appointed Rock Star of All Things Bookish – ie Children’s Laureate – in June 2013, and has now added a little icing to all that cake by being named the most influential black person in Britain.  Pour yourself a cuppa, get comfortable in that chair and let’s learn a little more about this literary powerhouse. One: She was first published by The Women’s Press It took two years and a staggering 82 rejections before Malorie got her first book deal. It was with the feminist publisher, The Women’s Press and she submitted a collection of short stories for teenagers that blended horror and science fiction. The collection was published in 1990 and called Not So Stupid. Alas, the same can’t be said about all those publishers who originally passed on her. Two: She read her first black book at 23 Malorie has said that it never crossed her mind to be a writer until her mid-20s when she read The Colour Purple. The Alice Walker novel was …